STORE HOURS: Open Mon-Sat 10am-5pm | Sun 10am-4pm

Douglas-Fir

Categories: , ,

Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) A beautiful evergreen conifer with bluish-green needles, tall and narrow, ideal for adding a prominent vertical accent to the home landscape; great as accents, privacy screens or specimen trees.

Also called: Douglas fir & Douglasfir. Douglasfir is not a true fir, but has similar characteristics to many fir trees.

Characteristics

Average Landscape Height:
45 feet
Average Landscape Width:
20 feet
Growth Rate:
medium
Genus:
Pseudotsuga
Species:
menziesii
Summer Foliage Color:
sea green
Minimum Light:
full sun
Maximum Light:
full sun
Minimum Moisture:
moist
Maximum Moisture:
moist
Plant Form:
pyramidal
Canopy:
low
Pruning:
only prune new growth
Pollution Tolerance:
medium
Branching:
excurrent
Evergreen:
1
Density:
dense

Ornamental Features

Douglas Fir is primarily valued in the landscape for its distinctively pyramidal habit of growth. It has attractive bluish-green evergreen foliage. The needles are highly ornamental and remain bluish-green throughout the winter.

Landscape Attributes

Douglas Fir is a dense evergreen tree with a strong central leader and a distinctive and refined pyramidal form. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage.

Planting & Growing

Douglas Fir will grow to be about 45 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 20 feet. It has a low canopy, and should not be planted underneath power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live to a ripe old age of 120 years or more; think of this as a heritage tree for future generations!

This tree should only be grown in full sunlight. It requires an evenly moist well-drained soil for optimal growth, but will die in standing water. It is not particular as to soil type, but has a definite preference for acidic soils. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution, and will benefit from being planted in a relatively sheltered location. Consider applying a thick mulch around the root zone in winter to protect it in exposed locations or colder microclimates. This is a selection of a native North American species.

PREVIOUSLY VIEWED ITEMS