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Eastern Larch

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A tall coniferous tree with deciduous needles starting bright green in spring and turning brilliant gold in fall; prefers moist locations and sandy soils; 1 of 4 deciduous conifers that Wasco grows. (Others: Ginkgo, Larch, Dawn Redwood, Baldcypress)

Eastern Larch are an endangered Native species to Illinois. Help protect the longevity of this wonderful tree by planting young ones at your property. (Endangered Status verified by Illinois DNR)

Characteristics

Species:
laricina
Other Species Names:
Tamarack
Average Landscape Height:
50 feet
Average Landscape Width:
20 feet
Genus:
Larix
Branching:
excurrent
Plant Form:
pyramidal
Canopy:
low
Density:
open
Growth Rate:
medium
Pruning:
best if not pruned
Summer Foliage Color:
green
Fall Color:
gold
Maximum Light:
full sun
Minimum Light:
full sun
Maximum Moisture:
wet
Minimum Moisture:
average
Pollution Tolerance:
medium

Ornamental Features

Eastern Larch is primarily valued in the landscape for its distinctively pyramidal habit of growth. It has bluish-green deciduous foliage which emerges light green in spring. The needle-like leaves turn an outstanding gold in the fall. The rough gray bark and gold branches add an interesting dimension to the landscape.

Landscape Attributes

Eastern Larch is an open deciduous tree with a strong central leader and a distinctive and refined pyramidal form. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition which can make it a great accent feature on this basis alone.

Planting & Growing

Eastern Larch will grow to be about 50 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 20 feet. It has a low canopy with a typical clearance of 1 foot from the ground, and should not be planted underneath power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 60 years or more.

This tree does best in full sun to partial shade. It is quite adaptable, prefering to grow in average to wet conditions, and will even tolerate some standing water. It is not particular as to soil type, but has a definite preference for acidic soils. It is quite intolerant of urban pollution, therefore inner city or urban streetside plantings are best avoided. This species is native to parts of North America.

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