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Japanese Jack-In-The-Pulpit

Category:

A unique and unusual perennial that prefers shaded and moist areas; before its dormancy in late summer, this selection produces a stunning bloom with smoky purple and white spathe

Characteristics

Species:
sikokianum
Other Species Names:
Dragon Root
Average Landscape Height:
8 inches (16 inches with the flowers)
Average Landscape Width:
12 inches
Genus:
Arisaema
Branching:
herbaceous
Plant Form:
upright spreading
Canopy:
low
Density:
open
Growth Rate:
slow
Pruning:
best if not pruned
Flower Color:
white
Flower Form:
trumpet
Flower Period:
in early summer
Summer Foliage Color:
green
Maximum Light:
partial shade
Minimum Light:
shade
Maximum Moisture:
moist
Minimum Moisture:
moist

Ornamental Features

Japanese Jack-In-The-Pulpit features solitary white trumpet-shaped flowers with burgundy bracts at the ends of the stems in early summer. Its pointy leaves remain green in color throughout the season.

Landscape Attributes

Japanese Jack-In-The-Pulpit is an open herbaceous perennial with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

Planting & Growing

Japanese Jack-In-The-Pulpit will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity extending to 16 inches tall with the flowers, with a spread of 12 inches. It grows at a slow rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 5 years. As an herbaceous perennial, this plant will usually die back to the crown each winter, and will regrow from the base each spring. Be careful not to disturb the crown in late winter when it may not be readily seen!

This plant does best in partial shade to shade. It requires an evenly moist well-drained soil for optimal growth, but will die in standing water. It is very fussy about its soil conditions and must have rich, acidic soils to ensure success, and is subject to chlorosis (yellowing) of the foliage in alkaline soils. It is quite intolerant of urban pollution, therefore inner city or urban streetside plantings are best avoided, and will benefit from being planted in a relatively sheltered location. Consider applying a thick mulch around the root zone in both summer and winter to conserve soil moisture and protect it in exposed locations or colder microclimates. This species is not originally from North America, and parts of it are known to be toxic to humans and animals, so care should be exercised in planting it around children and pets.

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